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Horrific Conditions at Scudders Aviary - ‘Factory Farming’ Approach Takes Toll
Wednesday, February 08 2006 @ 07:38 PM UTC
Contributed by: fly free
Views: 7769
General News When it comes to the money, breeding parrots is easy.

Macaws, African Greys and Umbrella cockatoos retail at PetSmart, for example, for $1,300 to $1,500. Rose-breasted cockatoos sell for as high as $2,500.

When it comes to the work, breeding parrots is hard.

Caring for large birds and hand-feeding their babies is a full-time job. Baby birds need to be delicately fed many times a day for months. Breeders say the time invested soon outweighs the profit margin.

To compensate, they often sell unweaned birds at half the retail price to stores, where it falls to untrained staff members to feed them.

“It’s never been about the birds,” says Carla Freed, a Kansas breeder and researcher. “It’s always been about the money.”

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Most Recent Post: 02/17 06:44PM by fly free

Eco-tour to Rancho Los Ebanos;
Saturday, February 04 2006 @ 03:01 AM UTC
Contributed by: MikeSchindlinger
Views: 6964
Travel We're planning another trip to Rancho Los Ebanos, Tamaulipas, Mexico, where bird watching is awesome! Los Ebanos is a private ranch, five thousand acres on the Gulf of Mexico, just north of Tampico. There are three sympatric Amazon species, Amazona oratrix (Yellow-headed), Amazona autumnalis (Red-lored) and Amazona viridigenalis (Red-headed or Green-cheeked). Red-heads are endemic to a very small area and are highly endangered though fortunately, they are still doing well at this site. We will make two or three daily field tours to see amazons and other amazing flora and fauna of the Gulf Coast lowland forest including kingfishers, herons, cormorants, spoonbills and osprey on the lake and channel and many shorebirds on the coast. High on the list of many birders's 'desired to see' list are the Elegant trogon, Blue-crowned motmot, the Ferruginous pygmy owl, and Squirrel cuckoo, and we have gotten good views of several of them on most visits...

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Most Recent Post: 01/01 12:00AM by

Evolutionary theory aids species conservation
Saturday, January 21 2006 @ 11:39 AM UTC
Contributed by: roelantjonker
Views: 4921
Conservation Monday, 16 January 2006, 2:29 pm
Press Release: University of Canterbury
16 January 2006

Evolutionary theory aids species conservation

Two University of Canterbury biologists are part of a team whose evolutionary informed approach to conservation is aiding the recovery of New Zealand’s critically endangered parrot, the kakapo.

Dr Bruce Robertson and Associate Professor Neil Gemmell (Biological Sciences) are members of a research team that has just had a paper published in the Royal Society of London’s prestigious journal Biology Letters. The manuscript outlines how the team, led by Dr Robertson, used sex allocation theory to remedy a conservation dilemma. A key prediction of sex allocation theory is that females in good condition should produce more sons.

The kakapo, which today has a population of 86 located on a handful of small island sanctuaries, is the subject of much global conservation interest. They only breed every two to five years and about 58% of eggs do not hatch.

Providing breeding females with extra food over the past decade has improved breeding frequency and chick survival, but at a recently-recognised cost: females in better condition were producing more sons.


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Most Recent Post: 01/01 12:00AM by

Parrots Aren't Parroting Bad Behavior
Monday, January 16 2006 @ 09:27 AM UTC
Contributed by: MikeSchindlinger
Views: 7103
General News THURSDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Birds of a feather may flock together, but they certainly don't teach each other the compulsive habit known as feather picking.

While observing Orange-winged Amazon parrots, Purdue researchers discovered that abnormal repetitive behaviors are instead influenced by a combination of stress and genetics.

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Most Recent Post: 01/01 12:00AM by

European ban hurts African export industry
Monday, January 16 2006 @ 09:15 AM UTC
Contributed by: MikeSchindlinger
Views: 6492
General News Flu fear stops bird trade in countries like Mali, Guinea

BAMAKO, Mali - For these caged Senegalese parrots, chirping away their morning in captivity, a European ban to combat an Asian virus may mean freedom.

Or starvation.

In late October, a quarantined parrot from South America died in the United Kingdom from the H51N strain of the avian bird influenza, prompting the European Union to impose a blanket prohibition on the importation of all exotic birds.

The temporary ban has shuttered the bird export industry in some of Africa's poorest countries, forcing traders here in Bamako to choose between feeding birds they might never sell, or letting their investment fly away.

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Most Recent Post: 01/01 12:00AM by

birdie stock 2006
Friday, January 13 2006 @ 02:54 AM UTC
Contributed by: birdrescueron
Views: 6433
Shelters and Rescue Birdie Stock 06
The largest outdoor Parrot Festival ever held!

Memorial Day Weekend - May 26-27-28-29, 2006

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Most Recent Post: 01/01 12:00AM by

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