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Are parrots good pets? | 6 comments | Create New Account
The following comments are owned by whomever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Are parrots good pets?
Authored by: visualizer on Saturday, April 24 2004 @ 08:36 AM UTC
Myers is very good at fomenting guilt and pulling heartstrings about the
"noble savage" parrot (check out her screed regarding parrots and
people being in conflict). Yet Myers and the so-called experts she
recommends regularly get it wrong.

These folks on more than one occasion have mistakenly diagnosed
behavioral problems in birds as some defect in the environment (again
with the "noble savage" argument and guilt trips). Like Myers they'll
launch into full-blown rant -- akin to pulpit-pounding -- because their
logic is skewed to a preformed conclusion at variance with the facts.

They've already made their mind up as to what the situation is, and
won't look at the science (in the form of lab tests and veterinarian
opinions). Nor will they insist that a caregiver get the right tests to rule
out physical problems that can cause behavior problems (notice I am
NOT referring to hormonal surges as "problems").

I have taken charge of birds whose owners despaired after spending
considerable money on an "expert" who doused them with guilt trips and
terrorized the bird enough to lose all trust in them. Their only recourse
was to provide the bird a fresh start with someone else. That fresh start
with me included appropriate diagnostic tests that the previous
caregiver didn't know they should have requested.

Guess what: MANY SO-CALLED BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS IN PARROTS ARE
THE RESULT OF IMMUNE DYSFUNCTION CAUSED BY MALNUTRITION.

The so-called experts don't want clients to know they can't recognize
the signs of immune system dysfunction or malnutrition. And they don't
insist on the appropriate diagnostics tests to rule out illness. They would
rather have you believe you are a horrible person for having a bird.

They share many of the same traits as the production-line breeders they
rail against. They figure that if they make enough noise and point at
someone else, no one will notice their similar flaws.

[ Reply to This | Parent ]

Are parrots good pets?
Authored by: Paul Brennan on Wednesday, May 17 2006 @ 07:29 AM UTC
Who's point of view are we considering, the parrot's or the guardian's? Probably not too many companion parrots who, if given the choice, would pick a primate-style two-dimensional life of conformity and confinement over free-flying with a flock of the same species, soaking up the sun and rain and wind.

[ Reply to This | Parent ]